How to Cook Yak

by Chelsea Hoffman

Yaks resemble bison in overall physical form and in the quality of meats they provide.

London Stereoscopic Company/Valueline/Getty Images

Items you will need

  • Cut of yak
  • Assorted seasonings
  • Stove-top grill
  • Roasting pan

Yaks are large, long-pelted, horned animals native to Asia and similar to the bison of North America. The peoples of Mongolia, Nepal and Tibet domesticated the yak to provide meat, milk, fur, cookfire fuel and transport. Grass-fed yaks provide flavorful meats, close to beef in texture. Yak meat is 95 to 97 percent lean. Knowing how to cook yak gives you the ability to present a lean, healthy alternative to beef.

Yak Steak

Step 1

Coat the yak steak with your choice of seasonings, omitting salt because it may dry out the meat before it is cooked. Seasoning choices vary but can include using cilantro and a dash of rosemary for an herbal taste.

Step 2

Place the stove-top grill on the eye of your stove. Turn the heat to a medium-high setting, or 350 degrees Fahrenheit on a digital stove. Let the grill plate heat up for five minutes.

Step 3

Place the steak onto the grill plate. It will begin to sizzle immediately. Let the steak sizzle on one side for three minutes and flip it over. Allow the steak to cook for an additional three minutes.

Step 4

Remove the steak after it reaches the desired doneness temperature internally. For instance, a medium-rare yak steak should measure 125 degrees Fahrenheit, and a done yak steak should measure 135 degrees Fahrenheit or higher internally. Do not serve a yak steak that has an internal temperature of below 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

Yak Roast

Step 1

Place a cut of yak roast into the center of a roasting pan.

Step 2

Rub the roast with your choice of seasonings. Since it is a roast, you can rub it with salt prior to cooking.

Step 3

Add whole, peeled potatoes and carrots as an optional vegetable addition to the yak roast. Put the roast into the oven and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 4

Bake the roast, covered, for about one hour for every pound of meat.

Warnings

  • Do not overcook yak, as it will become very tough.

Photo Credits

  • London Stereoscopic Company/Valueline/Getty Images

About the Author

The author of such novels as “Planet Omega” and the romantic drama, “Chloe and Louis,” Chelsea Hoffman devotes her time to writing about a myriad of different topics like gardening, beauty, crafts, cooking and medical research. She's published with Dobegreen.Com, The Daily Glow and other websites, and maintains the site Beauty Made Fresh.