How to Seal Your Henna

by Casey Anderson

Keep your henna tattoo fresher longer by creating a natural seal.

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Henna tattoos are a safe and non-permanent form of body decoration where a paste mixture, derived from the henna plant, is painted on the skin by hand, in an intricate pattern. Traditionally an Indian tradition, henna has become very popular in the United States. Henna tattoos usually last up to 4 weeks and gradually disappear over time. However, sealing the henna will keep the color from fading right away and keep the tattoo looking fresh for days.

Items you will need

  • Lemon juice
  • Sugar
  • Small cup
  • Cotton ball or pad
  • Henna glitter (optional)
Step 1

Dry your skin surrounding the henna tattoo thoroughly. Check the tattoo to make sure the henna is not peeling or cracking. Avoid sealing if the henna is cracked as this will just seal the flaws in the cracked design. Re-paint the cracked or peeling portions of the henna and allow it to completely dry before attempting to seal it.

Step 2

In a small cup, mix together 2 parts lemon juice with 1 part sugar. Stir briskly until the sugar has dissolved in the lemon juice. Mix enough to cover the area of the tattoo.

Step 3

Dab the mixture gently over the henna tattoo using a cotton ball. Add henna glitter, if desired, to create a sparkle effect. Let the mixture dry to create a protective seal over the skin. Repeat the process every two or three days to maintain the seal.

Tips

  • The more you wash your henna tattoo, the sooner it will fade, so try and keep the area surrounding the henna tattoo dry.

    Essential oils can be added to the sealant to make it more aromatic, but only use oils that won't irritate the skin, such as lavender or geranium. However, people react differently to different oils so always do a skin patch test before putting oil on the skin.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Goodshoot/Getty Images

About the Author

Casey Anderson is a part-time writer and full-time marketer who has been published on websites such as Opposing Views and Salon. She has also contributed articles to local Detroit Magazines, Strut and Orbit. A Wayne State University Master of Business Administration graduate, Nation began her writing career in 2001 and has extensive experience in business and research writing.