How to Get Cigarette Burns Out of Fleece

by Jill Kokemuller

Cigarette burns can cause unsightly damage to your clothing. It is frustrating when one small burn means you can no longer wear the item. If you get a cigarette burn on fleece clothing, you may be able to repair the burn spot and have it look like new. Depending on the severity and depth of the burn, no sewing may be involved. But if you do have to sew, since fleece is thicker than most fabrics, the threads can be hidden in the material.

Items you will need

  • Washcloth
  • Warm water
  • Scissors
  • Fabric glue
  • Needle
  • Thread
Step 1

Blot the burned area with a warm wet cloth. Do not rub; rubbing can set the stain in. Blot until the ash is on the cloth and not the fleece. Once you have removed the stain, you can see the burn damage better and determine the next step.

Step 2

Clip away any melted or burned fibers. If the burn did not go all the way through the fabric, clipping the affected area and laundering the garment may be all you need to do. If the burn made a hole in the fabric, you will need to sew or patch the spot.

Step 3

Check inside the garment for any extra material you can use to make a patch. Often there is material along the inside of the zipper, at the seams or inside the cuffs. Cut a small piece of material for a patch. It should be at least 1/2 inch larger on all sides than the hole. If you cannot find enough material, you may be able to purchase matching fleece at a fabric store. Take your garment with you when shopping to color match.

Step 4

Apply fabric glue to the outer edge of the patch. Place the patch on the inside of the garment and press down. Once the glue has dried, rub or brush out the fabric around the hole on the outside of the garment to blend the patch and the fleece together.

Step 5

Sew the hole closed, if it is too small to need a patch. Use thread the same color as your fleece. Sew from the inside of the garment so any visible stitches will be on the inside of the clothing. Don't overlap the material, pull the hole closed so the edges meet. Do not sew on top of the fleece, run the needle under the nap and use small stitches. The nap of the fleece will hide the stitches on the outside of the garment.

Photo Credits

  • Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images

About the Author

Jill Kokemuller has been writing since 2010, with work published in the "Daily Gate City." She spent six years working in a private boarding school, where her focus was English, algebra and geometry. Kokemuller is an authorized substitute teacher and holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Iowa.