How to End a Wedding Toast

by Nicola Gordon-Thaxter

A toast to the happy couple should be meaningful and avoid embarrassment.

wedding reception image by Mat Hayward from Fotolia.com

Wedding toasts are typically beautiful speeches that honor the newlyweds with good wishes. A well-done toast can leave the happy couple with pleasant memories for a lifetime but a good toast can be spoiled by a bad ending. To wrap up a wedding toast well, it is best to end on a meaningful note. You can do this with a proverb, a poem or special song, or simply by expressing heartfelt best wishes for the future.

Step 1

Summarize the speech you made to the couple.

Step 2

State your final point. This could be an anecdote about the bride or the groom, or both of them. Make sure that this point has special meaning for the couple and expresses your good feelings towards them. If you are much older than the bride and groom and have been successfully married yourself for many years, you might want to end with a useful tip on how to remain happy.

Step 3

Raise your glass as an indicator that you are about to drink a toast. Wait until everyone's glass has been filled.

Step 4

Wish the couple well and encourage the wedding guests to repeat what you say. This might be something like, "A long and happy marriage to Mike and Trish."

Step 5

Clink your glass with the person next to you and drink the toast, waiting until everyone at the head table has finished, and then sit down.

Tips

  • Make the toast between 3 and 5 minutes long.

    Keep eye contact with the bride and groom throughout the toast.

Warnings

  • Do not mention ex-wives or husbands in your speech, as this could be uncomfortable for the couple no matter how funny you might think your anecdote is.

Photo Credits

  • wedding reception image by Mat Hayward from Fotolia.com

About the Author

Based in Leeds, United Kingdom, Nicola Gordon-Thaxter has been writing sales articles since 1995. Her articles have appeared in the "Milton Keynes Citizen" and on the ePolitix website. Gordon-Thaxter holds a Bachelor of Arts in English literature from the University of the West Indies and is completing a Master of Arts in writing from the University of Leeds.