How to Detangle Natural African American Hair

by Krystal Clark

Natural African American hair is one of the most fragile types of hair there is. A misconception is that because of its coils, and kinks, its not as susceptible to breakage. This is untrue, with with natural hair need to be very cautious when detangling their hair. Because of its coil shape natural oils don't always make it down the entire hair shaft, which means less nutrients, more breakage, and weak hair. Unintentional breakage can be avoided by properly detangling your hair.

Items you will need

  • Water
  • Spray bottle
  • Wide toothed comb
  • Moisturizer
Step 1

Use water. Natural African American hair is the only hair type where it it advised for you to comb your hair when it is damp. Therefore, invest in a spray bottle to use during the detangling process. Use the bottle to mist the hair with water; just enough to dampen but not soak.

Step 2

Use a wide toothed comb. Another major mistake naturals make is using the wrong comb. If your hair is straight, and fine, a narrow tooth comb will do the trick. However, if used on coarse natural hair, this comb will pull it out. To avoid this type of wear and tear use a wide toothed comb instead.

Step 3

Part your hair into 4 to 8 sections depending on length and thickness. Take a section and spritz it with water to dampen it. Smooth the water into the hair from root to tip. Take the wide toothed comb and comb from the ends working your way down to the root of the hair. Do this for each section until the whole head is done.

Step 4

Moisturize. After you have successfully detangled your hair apply a moisturizer. Make sure it does not have any petroleum, or mineral oil in it. Those are the types of substances that clog the scalp, and weighs down the hair.

About the Author

Krystal Clark began writing professionally in 2006. She has written for the Askew Reviews website and is the associate editor for a television and film blog ScreenCrave. Clark holds a Bachelor of Arts in media arts and studies, with a concentration in film theory, history and production, from Wayne State University.