How to Build Your Own Mobile Kitchens

by Peter Grant ; Updated September 28, 2017

Items you will need

  • Water supply
  • Kitchen flooring
  • Sink
  • Portable propane grill
  • Small squares of plywood

Building a mobile kitchen can be a very useful project to tackle on your own if you are thinking of starting your own food truck or street-food business. A mobile kitchen allows you to travel to different areas to cook and serve food. Building a mobile kitchen will require you to make a few key considerations that are different from what you'd consider if you were building a traditional kitchen.

Step 1

Consider if the mobile kitchen will include its own water supply or not. It can be much more mobile if it does not have its own dedicated water supply. The advantage of having an on-board water supply is that you do not have to rely on the presence of water fountains or spigots in locations where you bring your mobile kitchen.

Step 2

Purchase a small sink or bowl that can be used to house water used for cooking. Using standard pipe fittings, you can connect the sink to your water source or design it so that it can be attached to a common water-hose line found on the side of most homes and buildings.

Step 3

Place the propane-powered gas grill in an area of the mobile kitchen that is ventilated. If your mobile kitchen is designed for open-air use, you likely do not need a dedicated ventilation system. The advantage of a propane grill is that it is easy to start up, heats up quickly and can be refilled anywhere that sells propane tanks. Propane also does not leave a mess of ashes, like charcoal does, that you will have to clean up and throw away.

Step 4

Use the small pieces of plywood as a mobile kitchen counter. The advantage of using plywood is that you can also use it as a cutting board, allowing you to prepare ingredients directly on your countertop. When finished using the plywood countertops, you simply wash them with soap and water and hand-dry them until they need to be used again.

About the Author

Peter Grant has been a professional writer since 1998 and software engineer since 1995. He has contributed to academic papers, open-source software projects and technical documentation across several industries. Grant holds a master's degree in public policy from National University.