How to Remove Dark Circles Under the Eyes in African Americans

by Sharin Griffin ; Updated July 18, 2017

African American skin is more susceptible to dark under eye circles due to increased melanin production.

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People with darker skin tones are more susceptible to dark under-eye circles caused by over pigmentation of the skin. Proper skin care is important, but may not be enough to solve this problem. Over-the-counter treatments vary in ingredients and may not be suitable for darker skin tones. No matter your skin tone or ethnicity, the dark circle treatment methods are the same. Understanding the cause of your dark circles, however, is most important when deciding on treatment options.

Apply a cold compress to the eyes as needed to restrict blood vessels that cause dark circles to form. Leave it on for five minutes each time. A cooled tea bag may also be used to relieve additional stress to the eyes and provide a natural astringent to minimize discoloration.

Sleep eight to 10 hours per night. Sleep deprivation contributes greatly to dark under-eye circles. Propping up on a few extra pillows at night during sleeping hours may also help prevent fluid from pooling under the eyes. Fluid worsens dark circles and contributes to under-eye puffiness.

Put saline drops in your eyes several times throughout the day to ease irritation caused by allergies. Allergies are one of the main causes of dark circle underneath the eyes. Keeping the eyes moist will help ease discomfort and keep dark circles at bay.

Apply sunscreen to the skin daily to prevent sun damage that can worsen under-eye circles. Darker skin tones are not exempt from the sun’s harmful rays and requires sun protection daily. Use caution when applying sunscreen to avoid contact with the eyes.

Opt for IPL treatments, or intense pulsed light therapy. This is a procedure that is performed in a dermatologist’s office utilizing low intensity lights to restrict blood vessels and minimize skin discoloration. IPL may take several treatments before desired results are achieved.

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About the Author

Sharin Griffin has been a freelance writer since 2009, specializing in health-related articles. She has worked in the health-care industry as a certified nursing assistant and medical technician. Griffin's medical expertise encompasses bariatrics and geriatric care, with an emphasis on general medicine. She is completing an associate degree in health-care administration from Axia University.