How to Tie Dye a Batman Shirt

by Lane Cummings

Batman, one of the major superheroes in the DC Comics universe, debuted in 1939. Wearing a Batman t-shirt is one way to demonstrate your allegiance to the comics and movies of the caped crusader. However, just because you're a fan of Batman doesn't mean that you have to look like every other fan of Batman. You can distinguish yourself from other fans of Bruce Wayne and his alter-ego by tie-dyeing your t-shirt. Because most Batman t-shirts tend to consist of dark colors, you'll have to dye them strategically.

Items you will need

  • Latex gloves
  • Plastic pan
  • Powdered dye
  • Bleach
  • 10 rubber bands
  • Plastic zippered bag
  • Washing machine
Step 1

Put on latex gloves. Mix powdered dye in a dark color, such as navy blue, black or steel gray, with 2 to 4 cups of water in a bucket. This dye is for Batman shirts that have dark colors, but aren't black. For black shirts, add a half-and-half solution of bleach and water in a bucket.

Step 2

Lay your shirt in front of you with the Batman logo facing upward. Crumple it up as you would a piece of paper, folding the logo inward.

Step 3

Wrap 10 different rubber bands around the shirt, holding it in this crumpled-up position. This will create a tie-dye effect that resembles the shape of storm clouds in a sky—a suitable complement to the Batman logo.

Step 4

Dunk your crumpled-up shirt in the dye or bleach solution. Turn the shirt over and over with your hands, allowing the dye or bleach to penetrate and make an interesting design.

Step 5

Remove the shirt from the dye solution and put it in a zippered plastic bag so the dye can set overnight. If you bleached the shirt, rinse it off in cold water.

Step 6

Wash the dyed shirt the following morning in cold water in the washing machine. Wash the bleached shirt right away, also in cold water.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

About the Author

Lane Cummings is originally from New York City. She attended the High School of Performing Arts in dance before receiving her Bachelor of Arts in literature and her Master of Arts in Russian literature at the University of Chicago. She has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, where she lectured and studied Russian. She began writing professionally in 2004 for the "St. Petersburg Times."