How to Remove Tagless Labels

by Talia Kennedy

Removing tagless labels can be expensive.

Ryouchin/Digital Vision/Getty Images

Many clothes manufacturers have switched from using sewn-in tags to tagless labels in response to customer complaints about the tags itching or poking them. Some people love tagless labels, which are usually screenprinted inside of a shirt's back collar. For others, tagless labels are just as irritating as the sewn-in tags and may even cause rashes. If tagless labels bother you, you can remove them, but you will have to purchase expensive equipment.

Step 1

Turn your shirt inside out so that the tagless label is facing out and easily accessible. Lay it on a flat surface, such as an ironing board or kitchen counter. You want to cover your surface with newspaper or a plastic sheet to keep it clean and place a towel or other absorbent pad underneath your shirt to catch moisture.

Step 2

Prepare your spot-cleaning gun according to your owner's manual. Most spot-cleaning guns, such as the Albatross SG-5000, use a chemical cleaning solution. Fill your gun's canister with the required solution.

Step 3

Aim the gun directly at the label, holding it about 2 to 4 inches from the shirt. Gently pull the trigger to eject the cleaning solution. Increase the gun's pressure as needed until the label is completely removed. Wash your shirt as your normally would to remove the chemical solution before you wear it.

Warnings

  • T-shirt silkscreeners and other clothing manufacturers use spot-cleaning guns to correct tagless label mistakes. The gun is a powerful tool that sprays chemicals at high pressures to remove the labels. Read the owner's manual to fully understand how the gun works before you use it.

Photo Credits

  • Ryouchin/Digital Vision/Getty Images

About the Author

Talia Kennedy has been writing professionally since 2005. Her work has been published in "The New York Times," "San Francisco Chronicle" and "The Sacramento Bee," among others. Kennedy has a master's degree from the University of California, Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.