How to Make Your Face Look Smoother and Younger

by E. Grace Gibbons

You are never too young to treat your face like royalty.

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Everyone wants to maintain their youthful appearance for as long as possible. If you want to make your face look smoother and younger, you will need to shower your skin with attention, creams, scrubs and at-home remedies. In a perfect world you could snap your fingers and appear 10 years younger, but on this planet it takes work and dedication to look good.

Step 1

Do a facial exercise to soften your expression lines, revitalize your skin and prevent more wrinkles. Tighten and slacken your smile, forehead and cheeks by moving your facial muscles repeatedly for a few minutes. The exercise will smooth away wrinkles.

Step 2

Watch what you eat. A diet with too much starch and fat causes cellular aging due to a high glycemic index. Instead, digest foods rich in omega 3 fatty acids, vitamins and fiber. Eat whole grains and fish to make your face look younger and more vibrant.

Step 3

Experiment with home remedies for glowing and smooth skin. Apply a banana-milk paste to your face and leave on for 20 minutes. You could also make a egg white and honey mixture to be left on for 20 minutes. If you don't want to get knee-deep in preparation, rub a papaya piece on your face for 15 minutes. Always rinse the remedies off with cool water.

Step 4

Exfoliate at least once per week. Skin becomes dull and accumulates on your face as you age. A quality facial scrub removes the dead skin cells, leaving your face feeling softer and looking better.

Step 5

Use a daily facial moisturizer. Anti-aging moisturizers that contain keratin, Coq10, or Phytessence Wakame protect the skin, boost collagen, and promote cell growth.

Step 6

Apply a night cream to your face every evening. There are many brands that can repair damaged skin, renew the skin, slow the rate of cell aging, soften wrinkles, and provide the skin with rich nutrients. You want a cream that contains shea butter, avocado oil, or active manuka honey.

Photo Credits

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About the Author

E. Grace Gibbons started writing in 2006 as a contributing writer for CNHI Publications. In 2009 she became an interim editor at the "Press-Republican" then returned to editorial writing in 2010 as a senior reporter at Johnson Newspaper Corp. Gibbons holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from University of Massachusetts at Amherst.