How to Make Boar's Head Roast Beef at Home to Save Money

by Contributing Writer

Items you will need

  • Large baking dish
  • Top round cut of beef
  • Sharp carving knife
  • Butcher string

Boar's Head is a company well-known for its quality, delicious deli meats. Whether you love oven roasted turkey, roast beef or ham, Boar's Head has cold cuts to please every palate. Though they have tasty meats, Boar's Head can cost a pretty penny, which many people see as a turn off. The good news is you can make your own roast beef and slice it deli style, just like Boar's Head. Learn how to make roast beef at home to save money.

Step 1

Choose a top round piece of beef. When choosing your top round, make sure your cut of meat is either prime or choice for quality purposes.

Step 2

Top rounds come with fat attached to them. Trim off excess fat and set aside, being sure you don't throw it out. On the top round, there is a piece of meat called the cap. The cap needs to be trimmed off and can be used for dishes like stir fry.

Step 3

Once the cap is removed, it's best to tie the fat back on the cut of meat with butcher string. You can visit most any meat department or butchery for this. The top round is essentially a lean piece of meat, so tying the fat back on will keep the roast moist and tender.

Step 4

For the best cooking time, slice the top round in half against the grain of the meat. Cooking time should take approximately 2 to 2 1/2 hours at 350 degrees. An average top round will weight about 10-11 pounds. When cut in half, the roast will be about 5 pounds each.

Step 5

After you cook the roast, make sure to remove it from the oven and let cool until it's no longer hot. Remove the string and discard the fat.

Step 6

For authentic deli style meat, slice the roast in very thin pieces against the grain. Place on sandwich bread or in salads for delicious, Boar's Head-esque cold cuts. Refrigerate the remaining meat.

Tips

  • Add horseradish sauce to roast beef sandwiches for a tasty touch. If the roast beef has a reddish color in the middle, this is completely normal. Center cooking temperatures should not exceed 135 degrees, as this meat tends to be more rare than other meats.