How to Die Fabric White

by Kallie Johnson ; Updated September 28, 2017

A color remover helps remove colors and dyes from fabric.

Fabric landscape in black and white 20080525-1200179 image by SIGNSofMIND from Fotolia.com

Perhaps a red shirt slipped in with your white laundry and dyed all of your clothing pink, or your favorite white shirt has faded to a yellowish color over time. Unfortunately, there's no such thing as white fabric dye that can easily transform the items back to white. However, color remover can remove color and dye from fabrics, leaving behind a white or light-colored fabric. The process works better with light-colored fabrics, such as yellows, tans and creams. Be advised that when attempting this on dark colors, the fabric may not always become white, but a lighter color, such as an ashy gray or a light blue. If this happens, you can repeat the process until the fabric does not lighten any further.

Items you will need

  • Powdered color remover
  • Bucket or tub
Step 1

Fill a bucket or tub with five gallons of hot water. Add one ounce of powdered color remover. This makes enough to treat three yards of fabric. Adjust the recipe as needed to fit your needs. Powdered color remover is designed to remove all dyes and colors from fabric and can be found in the laundry aisle, next to fabric dyes.

Step 2

Saturate the fabric in the mixture.

Step 3

Allow the fabric to soak in the mixture for thirty minutes. Check on the fabric. If it still has color, allow it to soak for an additional thirty minutes. Continue checking on the fabric until the color is removed.

Step 4

Remove the fabric from the mixture. Wash and dry the fabric following the manufacturer's care instructions prior to using or wearing.

Warnings

  • Bleach is not recommended for use to remove color from fabric. Bleach can eat away at the fabric, resulting in holes and tears.

Photo Credits

  • Fabric landscape in black and white 20080525-1200179 image by SIGNSofMIND from Fotolia.com

About the Author

Kallie Johnson began her writing career in 2009, contributing to various online publications. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She enjoys writing home and garden topics and considers herself an expert on do-it-yourself home improvement topics.