How to Clean 925 Silver Jewelry

by Lydia Stephens

Remove tarnish from your sterling silver jewelry

necklace image by Byron Moore from Fotolia.com

Sterling silver jewelry can be identified by a "925" marking. This marking refers to the 92.5 percent pure silver composition. Usually the other 7.5 percent is added copper to give strength to the metal. While pure silver is not very reactive and does not tarnish easily, the addition of copper makes sterling silver prone to tarnish. Tarnishing can be prevented by storing your sterling silver jewelry in an airtight plastic bag, but when tarnish does occur, you can return the sheen to your jewelry with a few simple steps.

Items you will need

  • Pan
  • Aluminum foil
  • Tarnished sterling silver jewelry
  • Large pot
  • Stove
  • Water
  • 1/2 cup baking soda
  • Kitchen oven mitts
Step 1

Line a pan with a double layer of aluminum foil. Gently place your tarnished sterling silver jewelry on the foil so that the pieces are not touching.

Step 2

Fill a pot about halfway with water and bring the water to a boil. Immediately remove the pot from the heat and add 1/2 cup of baking soda.

Step 3

Pour the hot water and baking soda into the pan with the tarnished silver jewelry until each piece is covered completely.

Step 4

Allow the silver jewelry to soak for several minutes. If the pieces are still tarnished after 10 minutes, reheat the water and baking soda and soak your jewelry again until the tarnish disappears completely.

Step 5

Rinse your sterling silver jewelry thoroughly and dry with a silver polishing cloth. Store your newly cleaned jewelry in a dry place free from dust.

Warnings

  • Refrain from wearing sterling silver jewelry in swimming pools, showers or hot tubs as this will accelerate the tarnishing process.

    Be careful when handling boiling water.

Photo Credits

About the Author

Lydia Stephens began writing professionally in 2009. She has written online for Nile Guides, SheKnows.com and various other websites and has been published in "Stringing Magazine" and "Xiamen Wave." Stephens played competitive soccer for 19 years, has been weight lifting since 2007 and enjoys running, biking and sailing. She has a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from the University of Texas.