Estrogen Cream for Hair Removal

by Susan Reynolds

Many women have unwanted facial or body hair. Sometimes, excessive hair growth can be attributed to hormone imbalances. One way to minimize unwanted hair production is to use estrogen cream on your skin. Estrogen is a hormone that can act to inhibit some kinds of hair growth. You may need to talk to your doctor about ways to balance out your hormones.

Estrogen Cream

Phytoestrogen is an estrogen-like compound found in some plants that is used as a natural hair growth inhibitor. These plant estrogens are chemically similar to the estrogen hormone and mimic its effect in your body. In addition to other effects, it can help reduce the growth of facial or body hair in women. When you spread a phytoestrogen cream onto your body, your skin will absorb it and slowly decrease hair production over time.

Menopause and Estrogen Cream

If you are a woman in menopause, your hormones are likely imbalanced. Your estrogen production is decreasing as your testosterone levels slightly increase, causing you to lose hair on your head and grow hair on your body and face. Use a phytoestrogen cream to help level out your hormones by restoring some estrogen to your body. Not only will your body hair decrease, but your hot flashes and night sweats should diminish as well.

Application

You can apply phytoestrogen cream almost anywhere on your body. Focus on the areas where you want unwanted hair to disappear and spread a thin layer on this part of your skin right before you go to bed. Do not use any other creams or lotions in conjunction with the hormone cream, since they may interfere with absorption. You should start to see noticeably reduced body hair growth after about three months of daily use. In the meantime, you may want to use another hair removal technique, like waxing or shaving.

Warnings

Phytoestrogen cream is only recommended for women over the age of 18. It is not suitable for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding, since it can affect the baby. It can have negative side effects in men and in children.

About the Author

Susan Reynolds has been a writer since 2008. She holds a B.A. in English from the University of South Florida and is a licensed real estate agent in Florida.