How to Dry Cilantro at Home

Jill Swirbul/Demand Media

Freezing cilantro retains more of the herb's flavor, but drying is the second-best preservation option if you are unable to freeze the cilantro. Dry it using the cheapest, easiest method available. While a dehydrator works well to dry cilantro, air drying provides just as good a result. Dried cilantro lasts as long as two years, and you don't have to worry about freezer burn or other problems that occur when freezing food.

Jill Swirbul/Demand Media

Wash the cilantro under cool, running water and dry it thoroughly, but gently, with a paper towel.

Jill Swirbul/Demand Media

Gather the cilantro together, and tie the stem ends together with piece of string or twine.

Jill Swirbul/Demand Media

Hang the cilantro bunch in a dry area until all the water evaporates from the leaves of the herb.

Jill Swirbul/Demand Media

Place the bunch upside down in a paper bag. Tie the paper bag closed and poke several holes in the bag with the tip of a knife to allow for ventilation.

Jill Swirbul/Demand Media

Hang the bag in a warm, dry area that is not in direct sunlight.

Jill Swirbul/Demand Media

Open the bag and check the herbs every few days to see if the cilantro is sufficiently dry. The herb should feel crisp and crumble easily in your hand, with no areas of moisture. It should take about one to two weeks to properly dry your cilantro.

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