How to Cook Potatoes for Eight Hours in a Slow Cooker

by Jackie Lohrey

Wash potatoes but leave the skins on for slow cooking.

tonivaver/iStock/Getty Images

Slow cooker potatoes can be potatoes you cook and serve as a vegetable side dish or as an ingredient in a soup or stew. Either way, they are good for you, especially if you avoid cooking them in the presence of additional ingredients high in fat, sodium and calories. One serving of potatoes, about 5.3 oz., provides more potassium than a banana, 45 percent of your daily vitamin C requirement, 6 percent of your daily iron requirement and a healthy dose of fiber if you cook potatoes in their skins.

Scrub one to two medium-size baking potatoes per serving with a vegetable scrubber under cold running water. Pat the potatoes dry with paper towels.

Rub each potato with just enough olive oil to coat the skin. Set the potatoes in your slow cooker.

Sprinkle about 1 tbsp. of seasonings on each potato and turn the potatoes a few times to coat with the seasonings. Use a dry Italian dressing mix, onion soup mix or a combination of your own seasonings, such as paprika, black pepper and garlic powder.

Turn your slow cook to low, cover and cook the potatoes for eight hours.

Tips

  • Choose the right potato for the job. Baking potatoes are starchier, dryer and can withstand eight hours of slow cooking while retaining their shape and texture. Baking potatoes include all varieties of Russet potatoes as well as Goldrush, Norkotah, Long White and Idaho potatoes. In contrast, boiling potatoes have a high moisture content and will become mushy well before the end of cooking time. Boiling potatoes include all varieties of Red potatoes, Yellow, Salad, Yellow Finnish, Ruby Crescent and Australian Crescent potatoes.

    When you slow cook potatoes as an ingredient in soups or stews, use a baking potato if you want the potato to retain its shape during cooking and a boiling potato to help thicken the dish.

Photo Credits

  • tonivaver/iStock/Getty Images

About the Author

Based in Green Bay, Wisc., Jackie Lohrey has been writing professionally since 2009. In addition to writing web content and training manuals for small business clients and nonprofit organizations, including ERA Realtors and the Bay Area Humane Society, Lohrey also works as a finance data analyst for a global business outsourcing company.