How to Make Eye Cream

by Willow Sidhe

This cream is designed to clean and moisturize the skin under the eyes, already prone to dryness. This cream is also gentle enough to be used as an eye makeup remover. This recipe makes approximately 8 oz. of safe, natural eye cream. This article will explain the steps on how to make eye cream.

Items you will need

  • Lanolin
  • Mineral oil
  • Small sauce pans
  • Egg
  • Small bowl
  • Beeswax
  • Safflower oil
  • Wire whisk
  • Low tub or jar
  • Labels
Step 1

Combine 3 tbsp. lanolin with 1 tbsp. lanolin in a small sauce pan. Heat the mixture on low until it begins to gel, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Step 2

Crack an egg, and separate the yolk. Beat the yolk in a small bowl with a wire whisk for 30 seconds. Add the beaten yolk to the lanolin mixture. Mix well.

Step 3

Combine 2 tbsp. beeswax and 2 tbsp. safflower oil in a second small sauce pan. Heat gently on low temperature, just until the beeswax is completely melted. Add to the lanolin mixture.

Step 4

Add 1 tbsp cold water to the eye cream for additional moisturizing. Beat the eye cream until frothy with a wire whisk, about 5 minutes.

Step 5

Transfer the eye cream into a low tub or jar. Label. Note contents and the date. The cream will keep up to 30 days and should be refrigerated when not in use. To use, apply the cream around the eyes just as you would any moisturizer.

Tips

  • Mineral oil is used in this recipe for eye cream, as it helps remove makeup buildup. If you aren't comfortable putting it on your skin, substitute an additional tablespoon of lanolin. All ingredients used to make this eye cream can be found at some drugstores, natural health stores, well-stocked craft and hobby stores, or ordered online.

Warnings

  • If you are prone to skin allergies, be sure to test the eye cream on a small area of skin before using profusely.

Photo Credits

  • sxc.hu/gokce

About the Author

Willow Sidhe is a freelance writer living in the beautiful Hot Springs, AR. She is a certified aromatherapist with a background in herbalism. She has extensive experience gardening, with a specialty in indoor plants and herbs. Sidhe's work has been published on numerous Web sites, including Gardenguides.com.