How to Make a Shirt Looser in the Bottom

by Hosam El-Aker ; Updated September 28, 2017

You can stretch your shirt to make it looser.

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Chances are you've wished some article of clothing you own is a different size than what it actually is. With clothes seldom made to custom fit, many people are between sizes. And with weight loss and gain over the course of one's life, clothes may need to be different sizes at different times.

One common problem when it comes to clothing sizes is a shirt that's too small in a particular area. Luckily, there are methods of loosening problem areas on shirts so that they better fit you or how you want to wear the shirt.

Items you will need

  • Iron
  • Hanger
Step 1

Stretch your shirt by hand from the bottom. Pull on the shirt from the bottom while it is wet. It is important to do this while the shirt is wet because stretching the shirt while it's dry could lead to disfigurement or distortion of graphics on the shirt.

Step 2

Stretch the shirt with an iron while it is wet. Keep the iron heat setting somewhere between low and medium. Carefully iron outward over the bottom of the shirt.

Step 3

Hang the shirt to dry. Do this after every wash, not just after the loosening methods described in Steps 1 and 2. Air drying helps to prevent shrinkage caused by machine driers.

Step 4

Iron the bottom of the shirt while it is dry if you still need additional loosening. Iron the shirt the same way you did in Step 2.

Step 5

Ask a larger sized friend or family member to wear the shirt if you need it loosened further. Be cautious of just how much bigger the friend or family member is than you. Make sure the difference in size between you and your friend is small, or you risk ruining the shirt.

Step 6

Repeat Steps 1 through 5 if your shirt still isn't as loose from the bottom as you would like.

Photo Credits

  • Goodshoot RF/Goodshoot/Getty Images

About the Author

Hosam El-Aker's digital media career began in the 1990s, when online journalism was still in its infancy. His range of work includes published pieces in the fields of technology and electronics, website development, sports and world politics. The Washington, D.C. native has worked in Web development for 10 years and earned his Bachelor of Science in journalism from West Virginia University.