How to Get Rid Wrinkles in Linen

by Kate Sheridan

Linen fabric is a durable, lightweight but wrinkle-prone natural material that's been in popular use for clothing and household items for hundreds of years. You may reduce the severity of linen wrinkles by laundering the items by hand. Your linens will still need further attention to remove the wrinkles entirely.

Items you will need

  • Wrinkle releaser spray
  • Wash pan
  • Hand-washables laundry detergent
  • Dry towels
  • Plastic hangers
  • Clothespins
  • Damp towel
  • Iron
Step 1

Wash soiled linens in a small pan of cool water with a tablespoon of detergent specially formulated for hand-washables. Never treat linen roughly or wring it out by hand or machine.

Step 2

Rinse wrinkled linens, one at a time, in a pan of cool water. Replace the water as it becomes soapy. Repeat rinsing until water remains clear. Remove the linen from the water and gently press the linen between two towels to remove most of the excess water.

Step 3

Hang the wet linen on a plastic hanger and clip it securely to a clothesline to air damp-dry. In inclement weather, lay a towel on a clean, flat surface and lay the linen on it. Change the towel with a fresh, dry one as water saturates it. Retrieve the linen item before it is completely dry.

Step 4

Set your iron to its lowest setting. Place your linen on the ironing board between two barely damp towels. Iron the towels, being careful to check often that the linen is not twisted or bunched. Continue ironing until the linen is wrinkle-free and damp.

Step 5

Hang the still-damp linen on a hanger or lay it flat on a clean, dry surface until you are ready to use or wear it. Spray with a commercial wrinkle releaser spray and pull the fabric smooth if necessary.

About the Author

Kate Sheridan is a freelance writer, researcher, blogger, reporter and photographer whose work has appeared in numerous newspapers, magazines and trade publications for over 35 years. She attended Oakland University and The University of Michigan, beginning her journalism career as an intern at the "Rochester Eccentric." She's received honors from the Michigan Press Association, American Marketing Association and the State of Michigan Department of Commerce.