Skin Benefits of Using Peach Kernel Oil

by Graham Rix

Peach kernel oil's light body makes it efficient for massages.

Maria Teijeiro/Stockbyte/Getty Images

Peach kernel oil is a prime ingredient of many skin lotions and creams because of its anti-aging properties and light, penetrative consistency. It may also help if your skin is in need of rejuvenation or dry and sensitive.

The Basics

Pressed from the kernels or pits of the fruit of the peach tree, which originated in China and was brought to the New World in the 16th century by the Spanish, peach kernel oil sinks into the skin easily and helps revive it with a combination of vitamins and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Together, these nutrients may help in making your skin more supple and youthful in appearance.

Vitamins

Peach kernel oil contains vitamins A and E as well as a variety of B-group vitamins. Of these, vitamin E is particularly beneficial to your skin as it is an antioxidant, eliminating free radicals, which are harmful by-products of the metabolic process associated with aging and some cancers.

Fatty Acids

As you get older, your skin becomes more papery in texture and less pliable. Using peach kernel oil may help delay this process and maintain the elasticity of your skin because it contains varieties of polyunsaturated fatty acids, or PUFAs, which are associated with skin growth and health.

Emollient

The soothing, emollient nature of peach kernel oil can also benefit anyone who suffers from dry, flaky or sensitive skin. Individuals with delicate skin can also use it as a cosmetics remover. Unlike some other oils, peach kernel doesn't leave an unpleasant residue.

Applications

You will find peach kernel oil in a range of cosmetics and toiletries. Light, soothing and not too oily, it also can be used for body and facial massages. Applied as a facial, it can help rejuvenate wrinkles and clean out your pores. It can also be used as lip balm.

References

Photo Credits

  • Maria Teijeiro/Stockbyte/Getty Images

About the Author

Based in the United Kingdom, Graham Rix has been writing on the arts, antiquing and other enthusiasms since 1987. He has been published in “The Observer” and “Cosmopolitan.” Rix holds a Master of Arts degree in English from Magdalen College, Oxford.