Instructions for Dylon Permanent Fabric Dye

by Tobias Starr ; Updated September 28, 2017

Dylon fabric dye cannot cover patterns or stains.

green fabric background image by rgbspace from

If your wardrobe is faded or you’re simply sick and tired of white and beige clothes, change the color of the garments yourself. Dylon Permanent Fabric Dye is a quality dye made for permanently dying fabric. It’s simple to use with most normal household items as long as instructions are followed carefully.

Items you will need

  • Water
  • Large bowl
  • Wooden spoon
  • Salt
  • Washing machine
Step 1

Weigh your fabric while it’s dry. One pack of Dylon Fabric dye will dye 8 oz of fabric. If your fabric weighs more than 8 oz, you will need more than one packet.

Step 2

Wash it in the washing machine or by hand to remove any stains before dying. Do not dry. Leave the fabric damp.

Step 3

Put on rubber gloves.

Step 4

Dissolve the dye in 1 liter of water while stirring with a wooden spoon.

Step 5

Put 6 liters of hot water in a large bowl.

Step 6

Add 8 oz of salt and stir.

Step 7

Add the dye solution and stir.

Step 8

Place the fabric, unfolded, into the bowl of dye. Leave it for one full hour. For the first 15 minutes, agitate by squeezing the fabric and lifting in and out of the dye. Stir continually, but slowly, for the first next 45 minutes.

Step 9

Pull out the fabric and rinse with cold water until the water runs clear.

Step 10

Wash the fabric as normal in a washing machine or by hand, but with no other clothing.

Step 11

Dry fabric away from sunlight or direct heat.


  • For the next few washings, wash the fabric separately in case the excess dye runs.

Photo Credits

  • green fabric background image by rgbspace from

About the Author

Tobias Starr has been writing professionally since 2010. Her specialties include fashion/beauty articles, literary analysis pieces and the occasional commentary on cultural issues. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English with a minor in speech communication and a Master of Arts in secondary education, both from Morehead State University.