How to Epilate with Less Pain

by braniac

Hair removal is always a fight for some of us. Having recently switched to epilation-- a form of hair removal that uses a device to rapidly tweeze out hairs at the root-- I've become enthralled by the lack of itching and razor bumps compared to traditional shaving. But yeouch! My first time was a pain! It certainly doesn't have to be if you follow these steps.

Items you will need

  • An epilator
  • Exfoliating scrub and/or loofah sponge
  • (optionally) Over the counter painkiller, such as acetaminophen
Step 1

Shave the day before you decide to epilate; don't throw that razor away just yet! Unlike other alternatives to shaving, you want your hair to be short while epilating to prevent the hairs from breaking as much when they are pulled. It is also much less painful for your first time because less hairs will be pulled.

Step 2

(Optional) Take a painkiller, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen (aka Tylenol or Advil) 20 to 60 minutes before you decide to epilate.

Step 3

Choose a day to epilate when you will not need/want to be seen the next day; epilating for the first time can cause skin to become red. I would suggest to epilate at night before bed, as by morning, all the redness will definitely be gone. (As you epilate more, this stops happening.)

Step 4

Depending on how fast your hair grows, you should be able to epilate the next day (or perhaps you may need to wait until the day after). As soon as you can see the hairs, feel free to epilate: hold the epilator at a 90 degree angle against your skin and move it slowly against the grain of the hair to grab the most hairs. For some body parts, this might involve moving the epilator in circles or changing directions to get different hairs.

Step 5

After epilating, exfoliate the skin you have epilated to prevent ingrown hairs. (I like to epilate before I shower for this reason.) Use your favorite scrub or loofah to do so; I simply use a loofah myself. Using your favorite gentle lotion afterward is also a great choice for sensitive skin.

Step 6

Repeat this process each day, every day. Eventually, you will have pulled out most of your hairs at the root and will notice much less growth to contend with and will not have to use your epilator every day (which is the advantage over shaving). A little patience goes a long way toward punching out pain!

Tips

  • Epilating is a LONG TERM plan to hair removal, not a short term one. Take it with the mentality of going at it slowly rather than becoming hairless over night and do not be afraid to only focus on one body part at a time. For you toughies out there (or the reckless), you CAN just go ahead and epilate an area and clench your jaw through the initial pain; if you do this, you will only experience this pain once. As you keep up with epilation over time, you will never have to take on a jungle like THAT again. This is an alternative to those who prefer their pain in one giant serving and then never again.

Warnings

  • If you have very thick, coarse hair or compound hair follicles, you may bleed after epilating. As long as the bleeding is mild this is normal (and you can use antiseptic on the affected areas if you're concerned).