How to Do Body Bleaching

by Catherine Chase

Hydroquinone can lighten areas of abnormal pigmentation.

Pixland/Pixland/Getty Images

Hydroquinone is a topical medication often used for bleaching areas of skin that have abnormal pigmentation such as freckles, age spots or a condition called melasma. Your dermatologist can prescribe hydroquinone, or you may use a lower concentration available over the counter. Apply hydroquinone twice daily until you have the desired results. It may take up to four weeks to notice a difference in your skin. Discontinue use and consult a dermatologist if you do not notice any difference after three months of using the product.

Items you will need

  • Hydroquinone
  • Cleanser
  • Soap
  • Moisturizer
  • Sunblock
Step 1

Apply a small dab of hydroquinone to a small area of the skin you wish to lighten to test for sensitivity before applying to a large area. Wait for 24 hours and inspect the test area. If you notice redness and experience itching, discontinue use.

Step 2

Clean your skin with a mild cleanser and water before attempting body bleaching. Dry the area thoroughly.

Step 3

Apply a thin layer of hydroquinone to the area, distributing it evenly and massaging it into your skin with your fingers. Do not spread the cream to areas of your skin not affected by abnormal pigmentation.

Step 4

Wash your hands well with warm water and soap.

Step 5

Wait about five minutes before applying moisturizer, sunblock or other products to your skin. Avoid using harsh or exfoliating products on the treated skin.

Warnings

  • Avoid this product if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, or if you have kidney or liver disease. Do not apply hydroquinone near the mouth, eyes or nose. If the product does get into these sensitive areas, rinse it well with water. Do not use hydroquinone on areas of skin that are broken, dry or otherwise damaged. Avoid excessive exposure to sunlight and do not use tanning beds or similar devices. Using this product with products that contain peroxide can temporarily stain the skin.

Photo Credits

  • Pixland/Pixland/Getty Images

About the Author

Catherine Chase is a professional writer specializing in history and health topics. Chase also covers finance, home improvement and gardening topics. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in American studies from Skidmore College.