Ancient Egyptian Method to Remove Scars

by Norah Faith

Ancient Egyptian methods for health care and scar removal date back about 5,000 years. Ancient Egyptians were meticulous when it came to caring for their bodies. They had many different herbs, oils and other substances that they applied topically for skin ailments including burns, bites and scars.

Ancient Egyptian Topical Remedies

Topical remedies of ancient Egyptians varied from oils to spices to barks and berries. Almond oil, with its mild aroma and light texture, was used since it quickly absorbed into the skin. Rose attar oil, also gentle, was known to do wonders in healing and strengthening facial skin.

The bark and leaves of the acacia nilotica tree were used by the Egyptians to treat skin ailments since they worked as an astringent. Another astringent, henna, was used for treating open wounds and worked as a cooling agent on burnt skin.

The leaves of the wolfberry plant enhanced the complexion, prevented scars and removed toxins in the skin. Honey, with its antiseptic properties, was used to dress wounds and worked as a healing agent. The Egyptians also used castor oil, coriander and beer topically to treat skin ailments.

Ancient Egyptian Recipe to Remove Scars

Many Egyptian healing recipes have been long forgotten. Some, recorded on the Papyrus of Ancient Egypt, contain ingredients that are no longer obtainable. For example, moringa oil, frankincense, fermented fruit juices and grass were the ingredients listed in one Egyptian recipe for scars, wrinkles and stretch marks. However no specifics are given, and moringa oil is unheard of these days.

Another ancient Egyptian recipe for a substance to remove scars and clear the complexion is considered effective, though some of the ingredients have been omitted or replaced. The modern recipe uses almond oil as a base oil, with the addition of a healing essential oil. Because essential oils are very powerful, they can damage your skin, so just a couple of drops are all that are needed. Essential oils to try include frankincense, rose and wolfberry seed oils.

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About the Author

Norah Faith was born and raised in Texas and from there she has traveled nationally and internationally. After acquiring her teaching license from New Mexico State University, she found herself teaching ESL around the world. She continues to teach today and finds satisfaction writing for Demand Studios and other sites.