The Best Way to Cook Pork Roast With the Bone In

by Perry Miller

Next time you need to feed a crowd, think of making a pork roast instead of the typical chicken or turkey. A bone-in pork roast has a great “wow” factor and is simple to cook. Preparing your meat prior to cooking and knowing the correct temperature for doneness are essential. Following a few simple guidelines will have you putting your pork roast on the table in no time.

Preparation

Prepare your meat by rubbing it all over with your favorite meat rub the night before you plan on cooking. You can purchase premade rubs or a simple one is ¼ cup salt, ¼ cup black pepper, ¼ cup brown sugar and ¼ cup paprika. This is a basic rub you can use on any meat. You can also add any dry spices that appeal to you. After rubbing the meat, refrigerate until ready to cook.

Searing

Searing is an essential step to a moist end product. Heat a large pan, with enough oil to coat the bottom, over high heat. Make sure the pan is large enough to fit the entire roast. Sear the meat until it has a nice golden crust. Repeat on all sides of the meat.

Roasting

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Place your roast into a roasting pan. To add extra flavor you could make a bed of vegetables--carrots, onions, celery, garlic and parsnips--and place the roast on top of the vegetables.

Cooking Times

Bone-in pork roasts typically take 30 minutes per pound to cook through, according to Mahalo.com

Temperature

Always take the temperature of your meat using a meat thermometer. For medium, your temperature should be 160 degrees and 170 degrees for well-done. You can pull your meat from the oven a few degrees shy of your desired temperature. Your meat will continue to cook while you allow it to rest on the counter before you slice. Resting the meat is essential. It allows all of the juices to redistribute throughout the roast.

About the Author

Perry Miller attended Southwest Missouri State University - now Missouri State - receiving her Bachelor of Arts in journalism in 2005. Miller began her freelance career in 1999 and and self-publishes a local newspaper, "PUSH," that is distributed in more than 200 local high schools.