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Pros and Cons of Rooming With a Best Friend

by Emma Wells, studioD

How awesome is it that you and your BFF are at college together? And how much more awesome would it be if you were roommates? Living with each other can be exciting, but it might also be nerve-wracking if you’re afraid that it will lead to confrontation. Carefully consider your relationship before moving it to this level; once you share a room, you can’t really go back.

Pro: The Devil You Know

No more fear of living with a weird stranger who listens to music you hate and snores like a truck. You know your best friend better than you know anyone, so you’re probably already aware of her quirks. Even if you do learn something new about her, you’ll be more comfortable than you would with a less friendly roommate. After all, you might talk in your sleep, too. But you won’t have to be embarrassed if it’s only in front of your bestie.

Con: Joined at the Hip

If you already have the same friends and do everything together, sharing a living space might be too much. Rooming together isn’t a good idea if you’re already co-dependent. Determine when and how you will each get space away from each other so that you don’t get sick of the person you love the most. Roommates and best friends form healthier relationships when they each have their own friends, too.

Pro: Communication

You and your best friend have probably known each other for years, so you know how to communicate with each other. While adjusting to living with a new roommate may require some time, living with your best friend means that you may already know each other’s boundaries. Keep the lines of communication open so you can compromise on decorating, bedtimes and when to have girlfriends or boyfriends stay over.

Con: Caught in the Crossfire

Your best friend is like a brother to you, and like brothers, you occasionally fight. It’s OK when you each have your own space to recover, but when you live together, the environment can get tense. Figure out a system for cooling down, talking it out and creating solutions so that your room doesn’t become a war zone.

About the Author

Emma Wells has been writing professionally since 2004. She is also a writing instructor, editor and former elementary school teacher. She has a Master's degree in writing and a Bachelor of Arts in English and anthropology. Her creative work has been published in several small literary magazines.

Photo Credits

  • Kevin Winter/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images