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Federal Government Grants for Child Day Care Centers

by Ivory Adams

There are many grants opportunities for individuals, public and private non-profit organizations, schools, and child care centers. It's essential that you comply with federal/state licensing and approval requirements to increase your chances of landing one of these grants. The government reserves funds for child care initiatives that are geared to help improve the livelihood of children, especially those from low-income families. Child care centers play a crucial role in the development of our little ones. Many grants are available to help improve the quality of day care and make it more feasible for all families to reap the benefits.

What Are Grants?

Some grants require the applicant to fill out tons of paperwork.

According to the United States Federal Government, a grant is an award of financial assistance from a federal agency to a recipient to carry out a public purpose of support or stimulation authorized by a law of the United States. Many federal agencies offer grants in different areas. Child care centers just happen to be one of them. For example, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Child and Adult Food Program (CACFP) and the Community Facility Grant Program offer federal grant assistance to qualifying applicants.

The Child and Adult Food Program

The Child and Adult Food Program helps children receive delicious and nutritious meals.

The USDA manages the Child and Adult Food Program (CACFP) by providing grants to states. It is administered in most states by its designated educational agency. In others, it is run by the state's department of health or social services department. The program serves delicious and nutritious meals to eligible children (based upon a child's eligibility to receive free, reduced, or paid lunch) attending child care centers, after school programs, family home day cares, and adults enrolled in adult daycare centers. Public and private non-profits, Head Start programs, and other educational institutions are eligible for grant assistance if they are licensed and approved to provide daycare services. Child care centers can receive cash money back for meals served to children that meet federal nutrition guidelines.

The Community Facility Grant Program

The Community Facility Grant Program helps to fund child care centers.

This particular grant is opened to public entities such as counties, municipalities, non-profit corporations, and tribal governments, to name a few. The Community Facility Grant Program provides funds to assist in the development of essential and well-needed facilities in rural areas with a population of 20,000 or less. Lower populations with lower income levels will receive a higher percentage of grant funding. Grant funds can be used to enlarge, construct, or enhance community-based facilities for community and public services and other sectors. Child care centers fit within these categories. All applications are filed with USDA rural development state office.

Child Care and Development Block Grant

Child care centers help to improve the overall well-being of children.

The U.S. Department of Education of Health and Human Services administer funds to states to help low-income families with child care services who work, train for work, or attend school. If your child care center is eligible to receive federal funds, then you may be able to benefit from this particular grant.

The Golden Rule

Taking time to read all instructions will same more time in the long run.

Following instructions is a major factor in your grant proposal's approval or denial. Prior to applying for any grant assistance, make sure you read the grantor's rules and requirements thoroughly.

About the Author

Currently based in Georgia, Ivory Adams has written health- and healing-related articles for over five years. Her articles have been published in "The Observer Newspaper." She holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of Louisiana at Monroe.

Photo Credits

  • Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of James Emery