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How to Compliment a Guy You Don't Know Well

by Sharon O'Neil

Giving a man you don't know well a sincere compliment is a sure way to catch his attention and make his day. Even when you don't know all of his attributes, you can easily find a characteristic or trait deserving praise. Complimenting new male acquaintances can open the door for a new friendship, or even more.

State the Obvious

When you see a guy you want to compliment, look for something with his appearance you find appealing. Be sincere and point out how you like a feature such as his eyes, hair or smile. If he is a sharp dresser, comment on his taste in clothes. Many men take pride in things like a car, motorcycle or boat. You will score some points if you let him know you are impressed.

Observe Behavior

Take a little time to watch his actions to find something to compliment. It can be anything from the way he helped an elderly woman load her groceries in her car to how he scored the winning basket in a neighborhood game of basketball. Even if he doesn't succeed with an endeavor, you can praise his efforts. Also, look for traits to compliment such as kindness, intelligence or his sense of humor.

Ask Questions

Asking questions and showing interest are other ways to make a guy feel special. When complimenting his appearance, go ahead and ask where he gets his hair cut or if anyone has ever said he has a smile like Brad Pitt. When talking about his abilities, go beyond, "Good job!" and ask him to give you pointers if it's something you want to do, too. If he is an expert in a topic you are interested in, be sure to ask him to explain things.

It's All in the Delivery

Compliments will go further if you are confident and self-assured. Make eye contact and smile as you speak. Remember to give enough personal space until you get to know him better. Keep your compliment short and sweet to avoid embarrassing him or making him feel uncomfortable. Some men may misinterpret a compliment as flirting, so avoid giving mixed signals if there is no romantic interest.

About the Author

Sharon O'Neil has been writing professionally since 2008. Her work has been published on various websites, including Walden University's Think+Up. She has worked in international business and is a licensed customs broker. She is currently a supervisor with a social service agency that works with families to prevent child abuse and neglect. She obtained a Bachelor of Science in business from Indiana University.

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