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Can You Iron Tuxedo Pants?

by Melissa King, studioD

Whether you're getting ready to attend a wedding or a formal dinner party, you want your tuxedo to look its very best. If you don't wear your tux often, the pants might have gotten wrinkled in storage. Many tuxedos are made of delicate fabrics, such as silk or wool blends, so you may wonder if it's safe to iron them — but you can iron almost any type of tuxedo pants as long as you use the correct heat settings for the fabric (the instructions should be clearly written on the label).

Launder your tuxedo pants or have them dry cleaned before ironing. Never iron your tuxedo pants if they're dirty or stained. The heat from the iron can make stains permanent. Machine-wash pants in cold water on the delicate cycle, then hang them to dry.

Turn the pants inside out before you iron them. This helps prevent visible damage to the pants caused by ironing.

Lay the pants flat on an ironing board. If you don't have an ironing board, lay a towel down on a table or counter and use that instead.

Set the iron on the correct heat level for your pants. The ideal heat level depends on the fabric from which your pants are made. In general, tuxedo pants are made from delicate fabrics like wool and silk. The medium heat setting is best for these types of fabrics. If your iron has a silk or delicate setting, use it. Again, always consult the label on your garment for detailed instructions.

Dampen a washcloth with a small amount of water, then drape the cloth over the metal plate of the iron. The damp cloth helps protect the fabric from damage.

Press the iron against the pants, starting at the waist, and slowly slide it all the way down to the legs. If the pants have wrinkles, run the iron over them a few more times until they disappear.

Hang the pants on a plastic or wooden hanger in a closet or another spot that's away from direct sunlight.

Items you will need
  •  Ironing board
  •  Washcloth
  •  Hanger


  • If you must store your tux, keep it in a breathable suit bag and put it in a cool, dark place. Do not keep the tuxedo in the basement or attic, where extreme temperatures, humidity and insects may damage it.


  • Don't hang your tuxedo on a wire hanger; doing so may deform the fabric.

About the Author

Melissa King began writing in 2001. She spent three years writing for her local newspaper, "The Colt," writing editorials, news stories, product reviews and entertainment pieces. She is also the owner and operator of Howbert Freelance Writing. King holds an Associate of Arts in communications from Tarrant County College.

Photo Credits

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