Short Haircuts for Older Women

by Sava Tang Alcantara

Short haircuts do not have to be boring or plain. Older women may prefer the convenience and more professional look of a shorter hairstyle. Curly or straight, there are many options. Consider a perm if you have healthy hair. If you already perm and color frequently, give your hair a break and condition deeply before experimenting with a sleek, short hairdo that will allow healthy hair to grow back in.

Modern Shag

Consider an updated version of the classic '70s shag as seen on Mrs. Brady of the TV show "The Brady Bunch." While Mrs. Brady wore what we might consider a mullet version, you can have a shag with full bangs, cut above the ears to frame your face and kept thick in the back for a feminine look. Think Victoria Beckham.

Straight shags can be layered to show off thick hair. Curly shags can be left slightly longer to allow the weight of the hair to help prevent too tight a curl. Use a round brush when blow-drying to give your hair the fullness and volume for a modern shag.

Pixie

Sixties British model Twiggy made the pixie haircut whimsical. Her short 'do was thick and cut symmetrically. You can get a modern pixie that has well-trimmed bangs and even sideburns, or have one side cut slightly longer for an asymmetrical look that can still be worn to the office. Pixie haircuts are low-maintenance but require regular trims every six to eight weeks. Use styling gel to slick back stray hairs.

Go Curly

Perm or use your natural curl to your advantage. A round face can benefit from a curly hairstyle that is cut closer around the fullness of the cheekbones and thicker in the back. Oval-shaped faces can sustain a longer curly cut or one that is cut more closely to the head. Have a long face? Keep your curly haircut to the level of your chin to prevent looking too thin in the face. Side-part hair and use a round diffuser attachment when blow-drying hair and dry hair only until barely dry. After shampooing, add styling gel, finger fluff and let air dry.

About the Author

Sava Tang Alcantara has been a writer and editor since 1988, working as a writer and editor for health publications such as "Let's Live Magazine" and "Whole Life Times." Alcantara specializes in health and fitness and is a certified yoga teacher and personal trainer. She does volunteer work regularly and has taught free public yoga classes in Santa Monica, Calif. since 2002.