Instructions for How to Do a Braided Crown

by Christina Schnell ; Updated September 28, 2017

Popularized by celebrities Jessica Alba and Sienna Miller, the crown braid is an elegant and whimsical style that befits formal and casual occasions. A few requirements are necessary before attempting the crown braid. First, you need braiding skills sufficient to complete a Dutch braid, sometimes referred to a reverse French braid. Second, you will need long hair that falls at least half-way between your shoulder and elbow.

Brush the hair free of any knots or tangles, and part the hair down the center.

Part the hair again horizontally behind the ear. Twist and clip the hair above the part so it doesn't interfere with your braiding.

Divide the hair below the horizontal part into three equal sections, A, B and C. Place A under C and B under A to create a Dutch braid.

Draw a 2-inch section of hair from the scalp line and add it to section A. Pull section A under section C, and secure the plait with your pointer and index fingers. Braid downward and approximately 3-inches away from the scalp, making a U-formation around the hairline.

Repeat Step 4 with sections A, B and C as you continue forming a braid around the perimeter of the head. Continue braiding at least 3-inches equidistant between the center point on your head and your hairline. Use the natural hair-swirl as a center point. The hair-swirl is most visible on young babies, but exists on individuals of all ages.

Continue braiding until the braid encircles the head and returns to the starting point. Braid the remaining hair and secure the bottom with a non-rubber elastic band. Your head now should have a crown braid and a braid extension tail at the end.

Curve and tuck the loose, remaining braid into the upper half of the existing crown braid. Secure the base of the braid into the scalp using hair pins.

Tips

  • For best results, braid hair that hasn't been washed in a day. Slightly greasy hair holds plaits much better than silky, freshly-washed locks.

About the Author

Christina Bednarz Schnell began writing full-time in 2010. Her areas of expertise include child development and behavior, medical conditions and pet health. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in international relations.