How to Whiten Nails Naturally

by Kimberly Caines

Using a base coat when polishing nails helps prevent discoloration.

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Discolored nails are unattractive and may be caused by bacterial infections and medical conditions such as diabetes and liver, lung, heart and kidney disease. Applying nail polish without using a base coat may also cause yellowing of your nails. Covering up your yellow nails with more nail polish hides the discoloration but does not get rid of it. You can sport clean-looking, polish-free nails by whitening the nails using products that you most likely already have right at home.

Items you will need

  • Nail polish remover
  • Cotton ball
  • Bowl
  • 1 tbsp. 3 percent hydrogen peroxide
  • 2 1/2 tbsp. baking soda
  • Cotton swab
  • Towel
  • Skin cream
Step 1

Consult with your doctor to identify the cause of your discolored nails. Medical conditions such as diabetes, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, lung, kidney and heart conditions can cause nail discolorations as can bacterial, yeast and fungi infections. Treating these conditions with antibiotics or other available medical treatments may eliminate nail discoloration and can be done with the help of your doctor.

Step 2

Apply nail polish remover to a cotton ball and swipe it over your nails to remove any nail polish if needed.

Step 3

Mix 1 tbsp. 3 percent hydrogen peroxide with 2 1/2 tbsp. baking soda in a small bowl until a past-like consistency is formed.

Step 4

Cover the the nails of one hand with the mixture using a cotton swab. Pack the mixture underneath your nail tips as well.

Step 5

Wait three minutes so that the nails can bleach before rinsing your hand with warm water. Dry your hand with a towel. Repeat the application on your other hand and proceed to treat the nails on your feet in the same way if necessary. Moisturize your hands and feet with skin cream.

Tips

  • Repeat the nail-whitening treatment every six to eight weeks.

Warnings

  • Use a 3 percent concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Exceeding this limit may lead to irritation.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Goodshoot/Getty Images