How to Unclog Face Pores Using Steam

by Desi Crall

When facial pores are clogged, the result is often pimples, zits or blackheads. Skin blemishes can be painful and leave scars if not cared for properly. One way to help clear pores and avoid blemishes is to use steam to open them and release the oils that are clogging them up. The following is a simple guide to unclogging facial pores using items that are likely already in your bathroom and kitchen.

Items you will need

  • Water
  • Clean pot, bowl, or pan
  • Microwave or stove
  • Facial toner
  • Facial moisturizer
  • Facial exfoliator
  • Clean washcloth or towel
Step 1

Cleanse your face, preferably with some type of exfoliating scrub that is specifically made for facial skin.

Step 2

Dry the face with a clean towel or washcloth.

Step 3

Apply lotion or moisturizer under the eyes to keep the delicate skin from drying.

Step 4

Prepare a bowl or pan of hot water to boiling. You can use either a stove top or microwave to prepare the hot water.

Step 5

Place your face over the steam for up to 15 minutes. Wipe off your face with a clean washcloth or towel every five minutes, or as needed, and then re-steam.

Step 6

Splash your face with cool water and pat dry with a clean towel or washcloth.

Step 7

Apply a facial toner made for your skin type, then apply a facial moisturizer, preferably an oil-free one.

Tips

  • You can add essential oils to the water to enhance the facial steam. For example, lavender oil aids in relaxation, while tea tree oil works as an antiseptic. If you feel like you need more steam, but do not want to get closer to the hot water, place a towel over your head and the steaming area.

Warnings

  • Proceed with caution when steaming the facial area. If your skin feels too hotback away. Be extremely cautious with the eye area as well, as it is very sensitive and can burn or dry easily.

Photo Credits

  • Photo of facial steam from Google Images: www.healthline.com

About the Author

Desi Crall has a B.A. in Political Science from California State University Sacramento, and is currently a graduate student of Elementary Education at the University of Phoenix. Desi has worked as a freelance writer for three years, with articles and blogs appearing on sites such as Examiner.com, Today.com, and BrightHub.com.