How to Make Your Hair Straight When It's Naturally Curly Without Using Heat

by Thea Theresa English

Sometimes it's good to take a break from curling irons when straightening your hair

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When you apply excessive heat to your hair, it becomes dry and brittle, and if the heat on the curling or flat iron you are using is too high, it could cause damage to your scalp and the roots of your hair. However, it is possible to give your hair a straighter look without the use of a heating device.

Step 1

Give your hair a deep conditioning treatment. Use a leave-in conditioner because this will increase the moisture in your hair and help your hair become straighter as you comb it before styling. Once you put the conditioner in your hair, put a plastic cap over your hair and let it sit for 15 to 20 minutes, then remove the plastic cap and keep the leave-in conditioner in your hair.

Step 2

Use large or small rollers in your hair. Before you do this, apply some hair mist spray and some moisturizing lotion to your hair while it's still wet to ensure that it gets a straight and shiny texture. Then take sections of your hair and put the rollers in. Keep the rollers in your hair for at least 30 minutes.

Step 3

Take the rollers out of your hair and wrap your hair with bobby pins so that the wrap will stay in place. To wrap your hair, brush it completely down all around your head and then brush your hair in a circulation from left to right. Finally, stick some of the bobby pins at the ends of your hair after you wrap it.

Step 4

Unwrap your hair, comb it out and style according to your preference. If you want a unique but manageable way to wear your hair, consult some hair magazines and look at the ones which suit your facial structure and personality.

Photo Credits

  • Zedcor Wholly Owned/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images

About the Author

Thea Theresa English is a freelance writer who lives in New Orleans. She has written articles on career development, maintaining healthy relationships, politics and cultural issues. She is currently a graduate student at Tulane University where she will receive her Master of Liberal Arts degree.