How to Make a Halo-Style Headdress for a Flower Girl

by Andrea Hamilton

Items you will need

  • Coiled wire
  • Scissors
  • Floral tape
  • Small silk, clay or real flowers
  • Ivy

A flower girl's crowning glory is a halo-style headdress, complete with flowers resembling those in the bride's bouquet. You can make her wreath yourself since this enables you to get precisely the style and color you want. To create your flower girl's gorgeous headpiece, use silk or clay flowers for a long-lasting accessory or natural flowers for a realistic look. If you do decide to use natural flowers, however, create the wreath the day before your wedding, and store it in the refrigerator overnight.

Step 1

Wrap a strand of coiled wire around the flower girl's head so you know the circumference of her head. Leave a bit of slack at either end, and cut the wire accordingly with scissors. If the wire is flimsy, double up the strand to make a more stable headpiece.

Step 2

Twist one end of the wire into a small loop, and slip the opposite end into the loop. Bend it back to its own side. Twist the loose side to hold the circle in place, and cover the entire surface with floral tape. Though floral tape is not sticky on its own, it sticks to itself when stretched. It also makes a solid base for adding the halo's flowers.

Step 3

Wrap the individual flower stems with floral tape to help them stick to one another more easily. This is especially important for natural flowers, as their stems will not have as much give as the artificial ones, thus making them more difficult to add to the wreath.

Step 4

Wrap the flowers' stems around the wire so the blooms face the outside of the wreath. Secure the stems by wrapping them in a strand of floral tape. Position the blooms around the outer circumference to create a full look.

Step 5

Fill in any unwanted gaps between flowers with sprigs of ivy.

Photo Credits

  • Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images

About the Author

Andrea Hamilton has enjoyed being a writer since 1996. She has been published as a poet in "Fine Lines Magazine." Hamilton holds a Bachelor of Arts in literature from Iowa State University and is pursuing a Master of Arts in creative writing from London South Bank University.