How to Make a Fresh Flower Wedding Cake Topper

by Suzie Faloon

Items you will need

  • 2 1/2-inch round pedestal cake topper container with floral foam
  • 5 to 9 roses or other medium-size flowers
  • 7 to 9 stephanotis or daisy blossoms
  • Crystal-head or pearl-head corsage pins
  • Sharp knife

The wedding cake is one of the main attractions at a wedding reception. The bride and groom may use it as a focal point in one area of the room where the event takes place. You can have a cake topper that matches the reception decor or your wedding bouquet by making it yourself using fresh flowers. Dainty lightweight flowers will prevent the piece from pressing too much weight on top of the cake. Roses, stephanotis, daisies, carnations, orchids and Gerbera daisies are among the wide choice of flowers you can have on your wedding cake.

Step 1

Soak the cake topper container in a small dish of water for 20 minutes to saturate the foam. The foam will turn a darker green color as it takes in the water. Set the container on a flat work surface.

Step 2

Cut the stem of a rose or other fresh flower with a sharp knife so the flower is 3 to 4 inches high. Cut the stem on a slant. Insert the stem into the center of the floral foam.

Step 3

Cut four more roses or other flowers to a maximum height of 3 inches. Insert the flower stems into the foam around the center flower with the blossoms at an outward angle. Add more flowers to fill in the bottom sides of the foam.

Step 4

Cut the small stems from several stephanotis or daisy blossoms with a sharp knife. Insert a crystal-head or pearl-head corsage pin into the center of each blossom.

Step 5

Push the blossom pins into the foam between the flowers on the cake topper. Use these small flowers to fill in the gaps between the larger blossoms. Step back to look at the topper from all sides to make sure that the foam is covered.

Tips

  • Find floral foam containers at florist supply stores.

Warnings

  • Keep the fresh flower cake topper as lightweight as possible. Too much weight will cause the piece to sink into the cake surface or topple the cake tier over.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

About the Author

Suzie Faloon is a freelance writer who has written online content for various websites. As a professional crafter and floral designer, Faloon owned a florist business for nearly 25 years. She completed the Institute of Children's Literature course in 1988.