How to Get an Officiant License

by Kyra Sheahan

If you wish to become ordained and conduct marriage ceremonies, you are required to get an officiant license. An officiant license gives you permission to perform ceremonies and other types of religious services. While each state has its own rules about what types of individuals qualify to perform wedding ceremonies, the license requirements remain the same. An officiant license is offered to those who have proven themselves to be part of a clergy or religious affiliation, judgeship or military.

Step 1

Research the officiant license requirements in your state by accessing its marriage laws. Some states require individuals apply for ordination licenses to serve a particular amount of years in a ministry or congregation as a spiritual leader before getting an officiant license. Other states do not have such requirements. You must also find out whether your state recognizes online officiant training as legitimate experience, because not all of them do.

Step 2

Work as a spiritual official in a religious congregation. Pastors, rabbis, priests, ministers and other types of leaders qualify for receiving ordination licenses.

Step 3

Apply for an officiant license if you meet the individual qualifications as a spiritual leader, judge or military personnel. In some states family members may be able to obtain an officiant license with proper training. Look for officiating organizations that provide live courses or online programs to help individuals get ordained, such as Universal Life Church. Read through the program details and description to determine if this type of license is appropriate for your goals.

Step 4

Complete the application for the officiant license, and submit the appropriate licensing fee. Keep your license certificate someplace safe when you receive it.

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About the Author

Kyra Sheahan has been a writer for various publications since 2008. Her work has been featured in "The Desert Leaf" and "Kentucky Doc Magazine," covering health and wellness, environmental conservatism and DIY crafts. Sheahan holds an M.B.A. with an emphasis in finance.