How to Cook Purslane

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The edible leaves of the often overlooked purslane (Portulaca oleracea) bring crunch, texture and a citrus and peppery flavor to different dishes. You can eat it raw in salads, sauteed with other greens or combined with meats and fish to add a little tang. While most gardeners consider wild purslane to be a weed, this flavorful plant makes its way to upscale restaurant menus as well as home kitchens.

Salad Preparation

Rinse the purslane in a bowl of hot tap water. Add a capful of distilled white vinegar or apple cider vinegar to the water.

Pull the purslane leaves from the stems and combine them in a bowl with sliced cucumber and strips of nori in a ratio of 1 part purslane to 2 parts cucumber, and the nori to taste.

Season the purslane and cucumber with rice vinegar and sesame oil to taste. Top with sesame seeds, if you wish.

Side Dish Preparation

Rinse the purslane in a bowl of hot tap water to which you've added a capful of distilled white vinegar or apple cider vinegar. Dry the purslane on paper towels.

Drizzle a little olive oil into a hot pan. Saute some chopped garlic until it turns a light golden color. Add several handfuls of leafy greens and purslane.

Wilt down the greens, tossing them in the oil and garlic until they reduce in size by one-half. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot.

Entree Preparation

Rinse the purslane in a bowl of hot tap water to which you've added a capful of distilled white vinegar or apple cider vinegar.

Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a microwave-safe bowl, and add breadcrumbs until the mixture becomes thick and pasty. Combine the purslane into the stuffing, and add garlic and seasonings to taste.

Fill the open cavity of a whole fish with the stuffing mixture. Bake in a 350-degree Fahrenheit oven until the fish is lightly browned and cooked through. Fish to use include trout, tilapia, halibut or orange roughy.

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