How to Clean Sanita Clogs

by Cricket Webber ; Updated September 28, 2017

Sanita clogs are handmade in Europe according to the same guidelines as the first pair made over 100 years ago. Sanita fabricates their clogs in an array of styles, colors and materials. By taking proper care of your Sanita clogs, you can ensure that they have a long lifespan. If you wear your clogs often, clean them once or twice a week to remove stains before they have a chance to become permanent. If you only wear your Sanita clogs for special occasions, clean your clogs each time you wear them.

Leather

Spot clean the leather clog using a damp soft cloth and leather conditioner.

Remove the leather conditioner with a dry soft cloth.

Buff the leather with a clean soft cloth.

Suede or Split Leather

Spot clean with a damp cloth.

Brush the suede or split leather nap lightly with a suede brush. Brush just long enough to bring the nap back into shape.

Spray the clogs lightly with waterproofing spray once a year to protect them from stains and from water damage.

Snakeskin

Spot clean with a damp soft cloth.

Dry the shoes with a clean soft cloth.

Buff the snakeskin with a dry, soft cloth as you would leather.

Fabric

Spot clean with a damp cloth.

Let the fabric dry completely before you wear the clogs again so you do not stretch or deform the fabric.

Spray the clogs lightly with waterproofing spray once a year to protect them from stains and from water damage.

Velvet

Spot clean carefully with a damp cloth.

Brush very lightly against the nap with a soft-bristled brush to restore the velvet's nap.

Let the velvet dry completely before you wear the clogs so you do not stretch or deform the velvet.

Polyurethane-Coated or Waxed Leather

Wash with a wet cloth or sponge.

Dry with a soft cloth.

Buff with a soft cloth as you would leather.

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About the Author

Cricket Webber began writing for fun as a young adult and started writing professionally in 2010. She is based in the deep South. Webber specializes in articles on greener living. Her work has appeared in various online publications. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in education from Converse College.