How to Braise Meat

by Dana Severson

Braising meat works with cheap cuts as well as moister cuts of meat.

rezept rinderroulade 5 image by Rainer Schmittchen from Fotolia.com

Items you will need

  • Heavy saucepan with lid
  • Kitchen tongs
  • Vegetable oil
  • Flour
  • Water
  • Meat

Braising is a method of preparing meat by slowly cooking it with moist heat. Ideally, you would use this method for cooking your less-tender cuts of pork, beef and lamb but it works just as well with some of your standard steaks and chops.

Step 1

Heat a small amount of vegetable oil in a heavy saucepan, using only enough to keep the meat from sticking to the pan.

Step 2

Lightly flour the cut of meat. This will give it a nice robust, brown color after the meat is prepared and served.

Step 3

Add the cut of meat to your saucepan once the oil is heated, but not smoking, and begin to braise by browning the meat slowly and equally on all sides.

Step 4

Add between 1/4 to 1/2 cup of liquid and cover with a tight-fitted lid once the meat is browned.

Step 5

Let the meat slowly simmer on the stovetop or in a preheated oven. Times vary depending on the cut of meat.

Tips

  • If the cut of meat is larger, it may have enough juice that no extra liquid is needed during the braising process. If you’d like to add a little more flavor, try using broth or stock instead of water. If you use the oven to finish the braising process, preheat to between 325 and 350 degrees.

Warnings

  • Do not allow the liquid to boil. Braising is a slow cooking process. To bring the liquid to a boil indicates you’re cooking the meat at a higher temperature than needed.

Photo Credits

  • rezept rinderroulade 5 image by Rainer Schmittchen from Fotolia.com

About the Author

Based in Minneapolis, Minn., Dana Severson has been writing marketing materials for small-to-mid-sized businesses since 2005. Prior to this, Severson worked as a manager of business development for a marketing company, developing targeted marketing campaigns for Big G, Betty Crocker and Pillsbury, among others.