Does Mineral Makeup Work on Older Women?

by Chloé Baudin

Mineral makeup doesn't contain ingredients that cause irritation, so it's great for sensitive or acne-prone skin.

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You may have noticed an explosion in the number of mineral makeup cosmetics on store shelves these days. What’s all the fuss about? Not only do they contain fewer chemicals than other cosmetics, but they can help you look younger, too.

Mineral Makeup

Mineral makeup was first introduced in the 70s, but didn’t hit the mainstream until recently. The makeup -- eye shadow, blush, lipstick and foundation -- is made of minerals including titanium dioxide, zinc oxide and iron oxide mixed with pure pigment. They usually don’t contain fillers, such as talc which can clog pores, and are free of the carcinogen FD&C color. "Canadian Living" reported Ruben Potrebenko, makeup artist and national educator for Jane Iredale Mineral Cosmetics saying, "The whole idea behind mineral makeup is to not use anything known to interrupt the skin's natural function."

The Benefits

The number one benefit mineral makeup has for older women is that it contains the natural sunscreen titanium dioxide, which can help prevent the signs of aging caused by sun damage. Although it protects with an SPF 15 to 20, you still should wear a regular sunscreen underneath. Titanium and zinc help to calm and soothe the skin because they’re natural an anti-inflammatory. And while bacteria can form in regular makeup with time, that can’t happen with mineral makeup because minerals are inert.

The Look

In addition to preventing sun damage, mineral makeup helps improve the look of the skin because of its shimmery reflective particles. It makes you look glowy and luminescent, as if you were in candlelight, which can make you look better -- and even younger. It also doesn’t clog pores, which could stave off acne and make for a smoother, younger-looking complexion.

How to Apply

One tricky aspect of mineral makeup is since it doesn’t contain binding ingredients, it is loose and soft. New York makeup artist Susan Giordano tells the editors at "O Magazine" that it’s best "to begin with just a little powder on the brush to ensure that it doesn’t spill everywhere. Since it’s shimmery, you don’t need very much anyways, she says." Tap any excess before you apply it to the face.

Photo Credits

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About the Author

Chloé Baudin has been a health and lifestyle writer and editor since 2008. She has contributed to online and print magazines, covering personal finance, home decor, travel, preventative health, sports, science, technology, psychology and relationships.