How to Make the Best Steel-Cut Oatmeal

by Brynne Chandler

Steel cut oatmeal is thicker, coarser and less processed than rolled or instant oats. This gives it heartier flavor and richer texture, and – because the oats are closer to their natural state – steel cut oats are low on the glycemic index. Starting your day with a bowl of steel cut oatmeal does not trigger an insulin spike followed by a drop in your blood glucose. You feel full and satisfied longer and can perform better. The mistake most people make when cooking oatmeal is to load it up with sugar and fat. The best steel-cut oatmeal is served simply.

Fill a kettle with a little more than 3 cups of water and set it on the stove on high.

Heat a small pot over medium-high heat for one minute or so.

Add a sliver of butter to the heated pot. You only need enough to keep the oats from sticking to the bottom. The less you use, the healthier the result. Canola oil or a 0-trans-fat butter substitute will also work, but will not taste as rich.

Stir 1 cup of steel cut oats into the butter as soon as it melts. Use a wooden spoon to stir the oats constantly so that they don’t stick. Stir and cook the oats until they are toasted a light golden brown.

Pour in 3 cups of boiling water, adding it slowly and stirring it into the steel cut oats as you pour. Bring the water to a boil, and then reduce the heat to low. Let the oats simmer for 25 minutes.

Divide the oatmeal into four bowls, or serve yourself and save the rest to be reheated later.

Flavor your oats with something sweet and something creamy. Low-fat milk or nonfat vanilla yogurt is lower in fat and calories than cream or buttermilk. Use natural sugars like honey or pure maple syrup to keep the flavor up and the refined sugars down.

Tips

  • Add chopped nuts and fresh berries or dried fruit to your steel cut oatmeal for a sweeter treat with a little extra nutritional kick.

Photo Credits

  • bhofack2/iStock/Getty Images

About the Author

Brynne Chandler raised three children alone while travelling, remodeling old homes and enjoying a successful career writing TV Animation. Her passions include cooking, tinkering, decorating and muscle cars. Brynne has been writing fun and informative non-fiction articles for almost a decade.