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How to Write Thank-You Notes for Homemade Gifts

by Erin Schreiner

When the time comes to give gifts, some head to the store while others get crafty and make a present by hand. If you receive a handmade present, sending a note of thanks is a wise choice. By doing so, you can make it clear to the gift-giver that you appreciate both the present and the time that was put into creating it for you. To ensure that the note you send adequately conveys your sentiments, take care to customize your correspondence to the present in question.

Select a card or stationery on which to write your note. Choose a standard thank-you card or plain stationery, or buy one specific to the gift-giver. For example, if the person who gave the gift is a fan of roses, buy a card prominently featuring this flower.

Start with a greeting. Begin your thank-you with a standard "Dear," followed by the gift-giver's name. If you commonly use a title, such as aunt or grandma, when speaking to this person, include it in your greeting.

Specifically mention the gift for which you are thanking the individual. Avoid saying simply "thanks for the present"; this makes the note seem largely impersonal.

Comment upon the time and effort that was put into making the gift. Let the gift-giver know that you're aware of the time and effort that went into the present, and that you're very grateful.

Tell the gift-giver how you use the present. If, for example, she made you some hand-embroidered guest towels, tell her where you have the towels hanging and how much you enjoy using them to beautify your space.

Close the letter. End your letter with the standard "Sincerely" or "Yours truly" if the gift-giver is a friend. Use the closing "Love" if the gift-giver is a family member or someone for whom you really want to make your affection known. Sign the note to conclude your thank-you.

About the Author

Erin Schreiner is a freelance writer and teacher who holds a bachelor's degree from Bowling Green State University. She has been actively freelancing since 2008. Schreiner previously worked for a London-based freelance firm. Her work appears on eHow, Trails.com and RedEnvelope. She currently teaches writing to middle school students in Ohio and works on her writing craft regularly.

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