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How to Write a State Report in 4th Grade

by Kelly Chester

A fourth grade history curriculum often includes a study of the United States of America. In an effort to expose students to the different regions and cultures of the United States, teachers often assign a state research report to their students. You can make state reports vibrant, informative and memorable by including maps, pictures and detailed information about a state’s history, population and culture.

State History

Begin the project by exploring the history of how and when the state became a part of the United States. Information about statehood can help provide a timeline of the major events in the state’s history, which is an excellent starting point for a fourth grade state report. In the beginning of the report, provide all relevant dates, events and people connected to the state’s history. Such information will also connect to the state's culture and population.

Geographic Features and Climate

Next, explore the state's geographic features. Discuss what region of the country the state is in. Take note of any major bodies of water and describe how they function. For example, the Mississippi River provides important artery for trade in the 10 states it runs through or near. In addition, discuss the topography; share whether there are mountain ranges, open plains or both. Also, discuss the state's climate. Be sure to mention temperature, precipitation and whether the state is prone to natural disasters. Add climate maps and geographic pictures for reference.

People, Culture and Industry

You should also explore the state's people and culture. Research population trends and immigration in the report. Discuss the ethnicities and backgrounds of those populations and provide maps that detail the most populated areas of the state. Explore the state's industry, too. For example, if you are researching Florida, be sure to discuss the orange juice industry. Finally, write about the state's culture in your report. Discuss state holidays, traditions, sporting events and food.

Fun Facts

Be sure to add fun facts to the report to make it more interesting and thorough. Share information about the state flag, bird, flower, nickname, tree or gem, for example. In addition, list notable state residents, such as artists, writers, scientists and celebrities. If the report includes a presentation, consider playing the state song for the audience.

About the Author

Kelly Chester is an educator and writer who has worked in both public and private schools for almost a decade. Her areas of expertise include literature, writing, history and art for adolescents. In addition to writing reports for NYSAIS, she has also written a biography on artist Frank Covino, which was published in the anthology “Teaching Lives.”

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