our everyday life

How to Whiten a Veil

by Melissa J. Bell, studioD

Heirloom hand-me-downs remain hot-ticket trimmings for wedding-day wear, although these bridal bells and whistles rarely leave the storage bin looking ready-to-adorn, no matter their age. Dust, dirt, stains and time's yellowing can make a vintage veil that's seen better times look less than pristine -- but don't let a little laundry puzzle lessen your wedding-day bliss. Freshen up a dull, dingy antique veil or turn a drab-colored veil white with gentle, low-fuss laundering by hand.

Place a large, clean white towel onto a flat surface. Lay your veil over the towel and fold the veil corners inward to fit the size of the towel.

Cover the veil with a second towel to create a towel sandwich that will help hold the veil steady.

Add 1/4 cup of color-safe oxygen-based powder bleach to a small plastic container or cup. Fill the container with hot water and agitate it with a spoon to mix the powder completely.

Fill the bathtub with warm water. Pour the contents of the plastic container into the tub and let the bleach solution disperse.

Put on a pair of latex gloves to protect your hands and lower the towel sandwich into the bathtub. Submerge the towels fully.

Let the towels and veil soak for up to 2 hours. Check the color of the veil once every 30 minutes and remove it from the bath once it has whitened to your liking.

Drain the tub and rinse the wet veil and towels under cold running water to remove the bleach. Gently squeeze out excess water, but do not wring or twist the veil.

Spread the veil over a dry white towel and blot it gently with another white towel. Let the veil air-dry completely.

Items you will need
  •  White towels
  •  Measuring cup
  •  Plastic container
  •  Color-safe oxygen-based powder bleach
  •  Plastic spoon
  •  Bath tub
  •  Latex gloves


  • Never wash a brittle or fragile antique veil, or a veil that has delicate beading or wax in the trim. Let a vintage restoration specialist handle fragile veils.
  • Never use bleach, especially chlorine-based bleach, on silk or rayon veils. Let a professional cleaner tackle these fabrics.

About the Author

A writer with a Bachelor of Science in English and secondary education, but also an interest in all things beautiful, Melissa J. Bell has handed out beauty and fashion advice since she could talk -- and for the last six years, write for online publications like Daily Glow and SheBudgets.

Photo Credits

  • Digital Vision./Photodisc/Getty Images