our everyday life

How to Use Wardrobe Tape

by Mimi Bullock

If you have ever watched an actress strut down the red carpet in a gravity-defying dress, you may have wondered about how she kept the whole thing on without a "wardrobe malfunction." More likely than not, she was using wardrobe tape. This double-sided tape, also called fashion tape, creates a temporary bond between your skin and clothing or between two pieces of clothing. The tape can prevent a variety of mishaps, and -- good news -- it's inexpensive and readily available at department and clothing stores.

Fix a fallen hem by first putting on the skirt or dress. Lift the bottom of the dress and put it in your lap with the inside hem facing you. If the area that needs help is in the back, put the dress on a hanger. Pull a piece of tape from the container. The strip should be long enough to hold the hem up, with a little extra tape at each end. Apply the tape strip to the hemline between the dress and the hem. Do not apply the tape to your skin. Press down to secure the hem.

Prevent a gap in the front of a blouse caused by a missing button. First, put on your blouse, buttoning it up. Find the area with the missing button. Pull a piece of tape from the container, unbutton the button above the missing one, hold the blouse taut by tugging it from the bottom, and smooth the tape on over the fabric where the button should be. Press the blouse fabric over the tape and rebutton the shirt above the tape.

Prevent a loose neckline from gapping by placing a piece of wardrobe tape about 2 to 3 inches long along the inside of the neckline; press the neckline, with the tape attached, onto your skin.

Tips

  • Buy pre-cut wardrobe tape pieces for quick fixes.
  • Use fashion tape to secure bra straps to tank tops or short-sleeved blouses.
  • If you can't find wardrobe tape, use double-sided adhesive tape.

Warning

  • Fabric tape lose its adhesiveness after washing and must be replaced for the next use.

About the Author

Mimi Bullock's writing reflects her love of traveling the back roads of small towns and sampling the local cuisine. As a regular feature writer for "Southern Hospitality Traveler" and journalist for "Beachin' Magazine," she gets to experience the rich heritage of the southern culture. She is also a licensed cosmetologist who has her own skin care line.

Photo Credits

  • Siri Stafford/Lifesize/Getty Images