our everyday life

How to Use a Brow Shaver

by Mimi Bullock, studioD

Plucking thick eyebrows with a pair of tweezers takes time and can be painful. For men and women who prefer shaving away unwanted eyebrow hair, a brow shaver makes good sense. This small shaver allows you to whisk away very small sections of hair. It fits easily in your hand and has a petite razor head for exact trimming. The downside to shaving your eyebrows is that the hair will grow back quickly. Coarse eyebrow hair is particularly noticeable if you tend to wear your bangs short.

Pull your bangs back with a headband or hair clips.

Use a brow pencil or white pencil to shape the arch of your brow. Use the penciled- in area as a guide when you shave. Make short, feathery strokes with the pencil. If you normally wear glasses, use a magnifying mirror for a precise trim.

Apply shaving cream around the eyebrows without getting any in your eyes.

Prepare to use the wide vertical comb attachment. Start shaving between the brows to remove fine hairs located over the nose. Move the razor against the direction of the hair growth, using small strokes to avoid cutting away too much hair.

Wipe off the excess shaving cream and hairs from the razor onto a towel. Replace the head with the smaller brow shaving tips. This will be a small square or rectangular razor head.

Working under the eyebrow, between the brow and the upper lashline, use the brow shaver to remove stray hairs below the arch. Make small, tight movements to remove the hair. Clean the razor with the towel and proceed to the other eye.

Wash away the shaving cream and hair with a warm washcloth. Use brow scissors to trim the ends of long hairs, if necessary. Moisturize the area with facial moisturizer.

Items you will need
  •  Headband
  •  Hair clips
  •  Brow pencil
  •  White pencil
  •  Shaving cream
  •  Towel
  •  Washcloth
  •  Magnifying mirror


  • Avoid cuts by always using a sharp razor and moving the blades parallel to the skin.

About the Author

Mimi Bullock's writing reflects her love of traveling the back roads of small towns and sampling the local cuisine. As a regular feature writer for "Southern Hospitality Traveler" and journalist for "Beachin' Magazine," she gets to experience the rich heritage of the southern culture. She is also a licensed cosmetologist who has her own skin care line.

Photo Credits

  • Ralf Nau/Digital Vision/Getty Images