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Unique Halloween Treat Bag Ideas for Preschoolers

by Zora Hughes, studioD

Dressing up for Halloween is just one aspect of what makes the holiday extra- special. Trick-or-treating and Halloween parties are also part of the fun for kids and adults alike. For preschoolers who might be going to their first Halloween party or going trick-or-treating for the first time, it is even more exciting. Prepare your little preschooler for Halloween by making creative treat bags to give to friends, as well as making her own trick-or-treating bag to collect candy and other treats.

Paper Trick-or-Treat Bags

Help your preschooler turn a simple brown paper bag into a monster bag for trick-or-treating. Give your child nontoxic acrylic paint in bright colors, and have her paint the entire bag on both sides, including the bottom flap. Allow the bags to dry overnight. The next day, help your child cut giant eyes, warty noses and toothy smiles out of construction paper to create her monster bag. You can get as creative as you would like with the monster faces. Another idea is to make ghost bags using white paper bags. Use scissors to round out the top corners to give the bag a more ghostly look. Have your child draw big black eyes onto the paper bag and add another black circle below it to create a scary open mouth. You can give the ghost bag arms from white construction paper glued to to the sides of the bag.

Clear Treat Bags

Clear cellophane bags are ideal if you want to hand out bags that already have prepared treats in them. You can use cellophane bags in various shapes, from large and wide to narrow and tall. Before putting candy into the bag, help your toddler use a permanent marker to create a jack-o'-lantern face, a ghost face or a monster face on the bags. Next fill the bags with candy or treats that match the face on the bag. For example, you might put orange candy in a cellophane bag with the jack-o'-lantern face and white candy in the bag with the ghost face on it. Tie the treat bags closed at the top with a matching ribbon, as well. Another idea is to make a cellophane treat bag that looks like a witch's hand is holding the top of the bag. Have your child trace your hand on green paper, and help her add lines for muscles and red or black nails. Fill a large cellophane bag with candy, and then cut out the hand. Fold the cellophane bag's top over twice, and then fold the paper hand over it. Use staples to secure the hand on the bag.

Trick-or-Treat Buckets

If you prefer giving your child something more sturdy to carry her treats in, you can make a decorative Halloween bucket. To make a mummy bucket, for example, take an old gallon ice cream container that has a handle, and wrap it from top to bottom in white cheesecloth. Use nontoxic craft glue to adhere the cheesecloth to the bucket. Have your child glue on large googly eyes to complete the mummy look. You can also take an old paint bucket, cover it in orange felt and help your child make it look like a pumpkin using felt markers or cover it with black felt and add yellow cat eyes and whiskers cut out of felt.

Other Treat Bags

Make an easy Halloween treat bag using clear plastic gloves, such as the kind used when preparing food in the kitchen. First, place one candy corn in each of the five finger slots where your fingers would go in the glove. Then fill the glove with popcorn, jelly beans or any other candy in a single color. Green jelly beans or candy-coated chocolate will make it look like a witch's hand, but you can add any color candy you wish. Secure the open end of the glove with a ribbon. Another idea is to make treat bags that look like candy corn. Cut a triangle out of poster board, large enough to turn it into a cone when folded. Have your child use orange and yellow markers to create the candy corn look, and then staple it into a cone shape. Line the inside of the cone with yellow tissue paper, and then fill the cone with treats. Use the tissue paper to cover the treats, and secure with a ribbon.

About the Author

Based in Los Angeles, Zora Hughes has been writing travel, parenting, cooking and relationship articles since 2010. Her work includes writing city profiles for Groupon. She also writes screenplays and won the S. Randolph Playwriting Award in 2004. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in television writing/producing and a Master of Arts Management in entertainment media management, both from Columbia College.

Photo Credits

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