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Understanding Teamwork for Teens

by Rose Welton

From early childhood, your child has been learning how to work with and relate to others. This skill continues to develop throughout life, when teamwork is required in the workplace and at home. During the teenage years, you can help your child to understand the importance of teamwork despite his developing independence.

Sports

Teamwork is a necessary factor in most sports. According to HealthyChildren.org, performing with other similarly developed athletes will help your teen further build her skills. Additionally, sportsmanship is an important goal of sports for children and helps to teach respect and dignity. However, consistent teamwork can be difficult during the teen years, which bring about a lot of self-comparison and competitiveness.

Home and School

Just as it is important in sports, teamwork is also a necessary skill at home and at school. At home, working together as a team reminds each member of the family that everyone has value and that the house requires cooperation from each member to function. With school projects, working as a group or a team helps to teach teens that individuals with varying skill sets can still learn to work well together toward a final goal.

Encouragement

To help encourage your teenager to appreciate and practice teamwork, make sure that every person in your home has his own chores to complete. Additionally, point out instances at home or during sports where different teammates’ strengths and weaknesses were able to balance each other. Take opportunities to acknowledge good plays from other athletes on your child’s team, and offer plenty of support and encouragement whenever your teen is working with a group.

Examples

It will speak volumes to your teen if you display teamwork in your home or work environment, or with any of your group extracurricular activities. If you do not have any examples of teamwork in your own life to point to, you can still set an example by making positive comments when you observe teamwork being practiced. Finally, you can point out examples of professionals your teen looks up to, like athletes, to encourage the trait in your child.

About the Author

Rose Welton is a journalism major and a freelance writer. Her education is focused on nutrition and early childhood studies, making her an expert when it comes to writing about health and children's growth and development. She has written numerous articles and blog posts on various topics for online publications and has also worked on an Internet news team.

Photo Credits

  • Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images