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Things Needed for a Newborn Changing Table

by Natalie Smith

When you have a new baby, taking care of all of the details can be overwhelming. You may have remembered to set up the crib and to put in the car seat, but you may not have stocked your changing table with everything that you need to care for your newborn. There are a few general categories of must-haves for a newborn's changing table: diapering items, medical items, personal care items and clothing.

Diapering Items

The most important items on a changing table are diapering supplies. Keep the shelves or drawers underneath the changing table stocked with plenty of extra diapers. You should also have plenty of baby wipes on hand, including a spare package in case you run out in the middle of a change. Diaper cream is also another necessity for caring for diaper rashes.

Medical Items

Aside from changing diapers, you may also find yourself using your changing table for all sorts of other purposes, such as for taking your newborn baby's temperature or for bandaging the small scratches she may have inflicted on herself with her nails. Medical items that are useful to have on hand at the changing table include an infant thermometer, a first aid kit, saline solution and a nasal aspirator, cotton swabs and rubbing alcohol for caring for her umbilical cord stump and any special creams or ointments that your pediatrician recommends.

Personal Care Items

Because newborn babies can't sit up, many parents perform other personal care tasks for their newborn babies on the changing table because it is a steady, flat surface. These tasks may include trimming the baby's nails or brushing his hair, among other things. As a result, it is helpful to stock all of your infant's personal care necessities on the changing table as well. Some of the items you may find helpful to keep on hand include baby nail clippers, a hairbrush meant for infants, or headbands or hair bows that are gentle enough for use with a newborn.

Clothing

Because your child may have wet through or soiled their clothing, some parents find it helpful to store a few changes of clothing in the changing table. Having the clothing on hand eliminates the problem of having to leave the child unattended or carry them half-naked while you find the right sleeper or outfit in their dresser. Some parents keep all of the newborn's clothing at the changing table, whereas some prefer to keep only a few changes for emergencies.

About the Author

Natalie Smith is a technical writing professor specializing in medical writing localization and food writing. Her work has been published in technical journals, on several prominent cooking and nutrition websites, as well as books and conference proceedings. Smith has won two international research awards for her scholarship in intercultural medical writing, and holds a PhD in technical communication and rhetoric.

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